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Careers Advisor
What do you do for a living?
University careers adviser (now) previously a research scientist..

How did you get interested in what you do?
Science – was interested in nature. Careers adviser – wanted a permanent job.

What was your journey to reach the role you are in today?
(education/choices/university, college, training or apprenticeships/ CPD or professional exams/job progression): Bsc,PhD, postdoc, research group leader, careers adviser (in house training).

Talk us through a day in your life.
Careers adviser – advising undergrad and pg science students about careers, group work sessions about (eg) applications, further study, open days, writing careers material.

Was this your planned career when you were 18?
No.

What did your parents want you to do?
Work in the co-op at the end of the street!

What advice would you give to someone interested in your career?
Have another career first!

What other career directions could you go in?
University administration, recruitment agency, self employment.

Chartered surveyor
What do you do for a living?
I am a rural practice Chartered Surveyor dealing with country houses, farms and estates in Scotland. I advise clients on the sale, purchase and management of all types of rural property, with a particular specialism in the valuation of these property types for banks, tax and expert witness purposes.

How did you get interested in what you do?
My father was a Chartered Surveyor specialising in rural property. There was little advice available when I chose my career, but I had seen what it was like but accompanying my dad at times.

What was your journey to reach the role you are in today?
After completing a degree in Physical Geography (4 years), I completed a conversion course (Master of Land Economy) at the University of Aberdeen (1 year), which allowed me to register with the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors as a trainee. Once employed, I trained for two years and at the end sat my Assessment of Professional Competence (APC).

Talk us through a day in your life
Much of my regular work is based on carrying out valuations. Estate valuations involve inspecting the estate (houses, buildings and land). Once inspected, the office work involves all necessary due diligence, to check there are no issues that might impact on the value of the estate, plus the gathering and analysis of similar sold properties to utilise as comparable evidence, which are then all brought together to form opinions on the value.
Most valuations require written reports.
Consultancy and management work can involve advice on any rural property matter, but often this includes farm tenancy advice (mainly rent reviews and setting up new tenancies); rural businesses and development; and increasingly advice on renewable energy schemes.

Was this your planned career when you were 18?
Yes

What did your parents want you to do?
They were happy for me to do what ever I wanted.

What advice would you give to someone interested in your career?
This can be a varied career, which can take you into a number of property related specialist areas and often involves property types and scenarios that you have not experienced in the past.

What other career directions could you go in?
The background gives you a skill set capable of taking you into any rural based business.

Childcare manager
What do you do for a living?
Manager of an early years education setting – charitable playgroup, looking after (currently) 35 children aged 2.5 years to school age)

How did you get interested in what you do?
Got interested because of the experience there of my own children. Little advice as this did not used to be a career as such, and this has changed
(dramatically, with the introduction of compulsory qualifications to degree level) in recent years.

What was your journey to reach the role you are in today?
Volunteering followed by working as support staff, then practitioner, becoming qualified through SVQ route, and finally doing part time degree while working on the job as lead practitioner/manager.

Talk us through a day in your life
Getting up and seeing my kids off to school.
Going into work and setting up all equipment necessary for the day inside and out.
Briefing the staff on what we are all doing that session.
Welcoming children and parents as they arrive, dealing with any queries or points brought to my attention
Free play for the children
Circle time and curricular activities
Free play
Snack time routines
Conversation over snack to do with home activities, extending curricular learning from circle time or what children want to talk about
Free play
Sometimes completion of personal learning journeys or achievement books
Home time, talking to parents, telling them about points to note, particular attention paid to parents of those settling in, with some difficulties or celebrating an achievement.
When all children and parents gone, tidy playroom and put all equipment and toys away after required cleaning.
Complete paperwork for the day. Create or finish displays.
Go home – then reply or initiate emails as required. Liaise with other professionals as required.
Squish in two hours study
Welcome children home and do their thing until after supper While they are watching tv etc, I do more studying.

Was this your planned career when you were 18?
No!!

What did your parents want you to do?
Didn’t have any particular thing they wanted me to do; I had vague ideas of wanting to be a vet, but no specific vocation or interest

What advice would you give to someone interested in your career?
It’s incredibly rewarding, but also incredibly hard work looking after young children, and may not suit everyone. I started this as my second career post children and it suits me well and I think I am good at it, but I would have been rubbish at it in my 20s. Sometimes, you have to be flexible enough to change horses mid-stream depending on where your life takes you, and this I have done.

What other career directions could you go in?
I could have gone back to my pre-children career in financial services, but I wanted to stay at home to be there when my children came back from school. I also did not want to be a purely stay at home mum, so this fitted well. However, what drew me to it was the experience I had as a volunteer when my children were little as I realised there was a lot more to it than I had thought.

Anything you have not covered about your area of expertise?
1. Don’t expect to get rich looking after people in whatever sphere this happens (nursing, teaching, childcare etc)
2. Increasingly, childcare requires qualified people – which is only right given the importance of the sector to children’s long term prospects. Minimum level from December 2013 will be at SCQF level 6 – SVQ2. Maths and English are likely to be required as minimum entry points in the future too

Civil Engineer

What do you do for a living?
I am a civil engineer. I manage the development and financing of large public sector construction projects. I work for a company owned by the Scottish Government.
Most of my time is spent in the recycling sector dealing with waste treatment projects but I also work In the development and financing of other public buildings such as schools, hospitals, and colleges.

How did you get interested in what you do?
I had very little advice when I left school. All I knew at the age of 17 was that I wanted to leave school as soon as possible and go to university. I didn’t really care where I went or what I did which, in hindsight, was a bit silly.
I ended up at Dundee Uni doing civil engineering. I trained and qualified as a civil engineering when I left university. Later on I got more interested in the management and financing of construction projects so I did a MBA at Edinburgh Uni which I thoroughly enjoyed.

What was your journey to reach the role you are in today?
I scraped into university with four highers. I managed to get into Dundee University via the UCAS clearing system. I studied at Dundee for four years and got a 2(i) honours degree. After university I was lucky enough to get a job with an engineering design consultancy and it took me 6 years and two sets of professional exams and attending many training courses to become a qualified engineering.
In my late 20s I realised that being a good engineer was not enough if I wanted my career to progress; I needed to be competent in the managerial and financial aspects of my job as well so I did an MBA part time at Edinburgh Uni.

Talk us through a day in your life
A key part of my job is finding new ways to construct new buildings for less money and to deliver them in a shorter period of time. I spend a lot of time meeting people try to convince them of new ways of working. A lot of the time many people I work with are resistant to change so a key skill is the power of persuasion.
In addition to meeting people to help develop new projects I spend a lot of time with other engineers, lawyers and accountants to prepare all of the documentation that is necessary to develop and construct new buildings so I need to be able to understand the key issues that they are concerned with.
I also spend a lot of time with the Scottish Government and local authorities. It is the MSP that set government policy which influences what construction projects are required ( e.g. motorways and hospitals). It is local authorities that determine where local schools are built and where our waste is treated so I spend a lot of time trying to understand how best to develop new projects that fit with national and local politics.

Was this your planned career when you were 18?
No! I had no plan at 18 other than to buy a Porsche one day. (I’m still hoping!) In hind sight I wished I had stayed on until 6th year, got better highers and had taken more time thinking about what I wanted to study.

What did your parents want you to do?
Go to university as they never got the opportunity.

What advice would you give to someone interested in your career?
If you are thinking about engineering, make sure it is something that you want to do. I know many people who love their job and are very passionate about engineering but unless you have miracle invention up your sleeve your not going to become a millionare as an engineer! If money is what motivates you and you like numbers – try actuarial science or accountancy. However, if you get a buzz from making things happen, engineering could be for you. With engineering expect to travel. You have to go where the projects are. Before you decide on any courses, take time to speak to as many people as you can. Maybe try getting some work experience to see if you really like it.
If you are not a 100% sure but still like the sound of engineering look at universities and colleges that do joint honours courses. Doing engineering with, law, finance or management will give you more flexibility if you want to try something else later on.
Lastly employers don’t just look at qualifications. Evidence of a can do attitude is key, whether through paid or voluntary work experience.

What other career directions could you go in?
I am a company director so that gives me the potential to look at other non-executive directorships. Sitting on the board of companies or charities is a good way to share my experience.
Anything you have not covered about your area of expertise?
The internet and technology is a wonderful thing but there is more to life than the play station and Facebook.
If you can show that you have applied yourself either through study, voluntary work or a part time job that will go a long way.
Finally, it is not uncommon for employers to look at Facebook profiles so make sure you always present a positive and true image of yourself.

Civil Engineer 2

What do you do for a living?
I am Civil Engineer currently working for a Waste Management and Land Development Company. My role involves managing infrastructure projects as well as looking after environmental compliance matters for the company.
Currently this role includes the development of a Materials Recovery Facility to produce organic feedstock for an anaerobic digestion plant and refuse derived fuel for a plasma gasification facility, development of a hazardous waste treatment facility, construction of a composting plant and remediation/ closure of several landfill facilities.
On the environmental compliance side I look after matters relating to Planning Permissions and Environmental Permits for all of the companies facilities.

How did you get interested in what you do?
I have always been interested in engineering and construction projects, however at 17 I was not sure what I wanted to do. I had completed my Highers but had perhaps not done as well as I should have!
At this point I was contacted by the careers service at school who were asked to look out for possible candidates to apply for a trainee role in a consulting engineering practice. This lead to my first job and life in Engineering started from there.

What was your journey to reach the role you are in today?
I left school after 5th year and started work as a trainee in a consulting engineering practice in Edinburgh working on major highway and infrastructure projects. I attended college on a day release basis for 4 years to obtain a National and Higher National Certificate in Civil Engineering.
At this point I left work went to Heriot Watt University to undertake a BEng in Civil Engineering. After this I returned to consultancy working for two
further companies in Edinburgh on environmental improvement and development projects. During this time I undertook a MSc in Waste Management as well as taking professional exam for Chartered Engineer and Chartered Waste Manager status.
My role in engineering consultancy has developed over the years from starting as the office junior with the key job of making tea through being Technical
Director leading a team of staff and managing projects.

Talk us through a day in your life
At present I am managing the development of a Materials Recovery Facility to produce feedstock for an anaerobic digestion plant and refuse derived fuel for a plasma gasification facility.
This involves working with a team of consultants (Planners, Civil Engineers, Structural Engineers, Building Services Engineers, Architects, Ecologists, Acoustic specialist, archaeologists and landscape architects) who are helping preparing documents for planning permission and environmental permits as well as progressing the overall design of the plant. There is also interface with contractors who will be building the plant, our operations team on how the facility will run and be maintained and reporting to our finance team on how much the project will cost.

Was this your planned career when you were 18?
No at 18 I really didn’t know what I wanted to do. I was very fortunate that when I started my first job at 17 I was mentored by senior engineer who helped me focus on obtaining additional qualifications to go to university.
Following graduation I have been fortunate to work with some excellent engineers who have assisted my development and continued learning.

What did your parents want you to do?
My parents were keen for me to get a job, preferably with potential for training and development.

What advice would you give to someone interested in your career?
Look at the range of roles Engineers play in society and judge what you want to do, currently there are good opportunities in Energy and the development of infrastructure for this field.
There is good information on the Institution of Civil Engineers website http://www.ice.org.uk on careers option.

What other career directions could you go in?
There are a wide range of roles Engineers take on, there is development work, consultancy, construction, research and development, teaching to name a few.

Clinical psychologist

What do you do for a living?
I am a Consultant Clinical Psychologist, currently with 2 roles. One is a clinical role leading a service for survivors of childhood trauma and secondly a teaching and development role responsible for supporting therapists across Scotland to be able to provide good quality supervision. This is how we try to ensure that the quality of the service is maintained as well as supporting therapists to develop their skills.

How did you get interested in what you do? What advice was available to you when you chose this career direction?
When I was a teenager I had a lot of contact with people with learning disabilities and I developed an interest in how we could provide good services for this vulnerable group. As I learned more about what career options were available I realised that the role of clinical psychologist could provide a valuable service to a range of people with different difficulties. When I was at High School I volunteered with a range of agencies and services and was lucky enough to be able to get the opportunity to speak to a few of psychologists.

What was your journey to reach the role you are in today? (talk perhaps about education/choices/university, college, training or apprenticeships/ CPD or professional exams/job progression)
I did a degree in psychology at Edinburgh University, then a year as an assistant psychologist in Paisley. During these years (and even before I went to university) I was involved in a number of charities and had paid jobs providing services to people with a range of needs.
The biggest hurdle in this career path is getting a place on a training course (there is currently 2 in Scotland). I was lucky enough to get one and did a further 3 years to obtain my doctorate in clinical psychology.
Once qualified, I knew I had a real interest in working with people who had survived repeated traumatic events. Following a couple of years in general practice I was able to be involved in setting up a specialist women’s service for survivors of abuse and trauma in Lanarkshire. From there I applied for and was successful in gaining a consultant post.

Talk me through a day in your life… what sorts of things would it involve?
My day is incredibly varied. The role of psychologist in the NHS has changed a lot over the years, when I trained the main emphasis was on providing psychological interventions or therapy to people in distress. The role is much more varied now (although we still do therapy). As a profession, we are expected to be involved with teaching, training and supervision of other staff, research, and leadership of innovation in practice and service development. This month I have presented at a conference, taught at universities, visited a prison to meet people who are trialling a new psychological intervention for female offenders, been involved in the research of this programme, ran clinics for survivors of childhood abuse, supervised a number of staff and discussed training programmes, for a range of professional groups, which need to be developed next.

Was it your planned career when you were 18?
It was. I have been very fortunate that my plans have worked out and I still enjoy it.

What did your mum and dad want you to do?
They were happy to support whatever decisions I made.

What advice would you give to someone interested in your career?
The career is very competitive to get into. It is essential you get a good degree and you need to show a long term commitment to the profession, through getting involved in volunteering and ideally research. There are often opportunities to help out with projects in local services and try to get a wide range of experiences.

What other directions could you go in /work in within your field other than the job you have chosen?
There are a number of good alternatives, particularly if your main interest is in providing therapy and working with clients. It might be worth having a look at the Clinical Associates in Applied Psychology course and there a couple of these across Scotland. There are also very important roles for staff with nursing backgrounds in mental health who get specialist training and provide a lot of the therapy in a number of settings. This might include mental health, child and adolescent mental health, substance misuse, forensic or older adult services. The Scottish Government has committed to improving access to psychological interventions generally so the opportunities are likely to develop. There is also a course in counselling psychology.
Within wider applied psychology there are a number of other roles including educational psychology and occupational psychology,

If there is anything you have not covered about your area of expertise, please feel free to add here.
Although it is easy to focus on the therapeutic parts of the work, we describe the way we work as ‘scientist practitioners’. This means there is a strong emphasis on using scientific processes, knowledge and research, so having an interest in this area as well as working with people is a real advantage.

Company Director

What do you do for a living?
I am a Company Director. We organise language,educational and cultural programmes for students visiting the UK and Ireland.

How did you get interested in what you do?
I fell into it by chance whilst working abroad after a University degree. Started as a summer job as a typist and end up with my own company (after about 20 years).
What was your journey to reach the role you are in today?
Scottish Highers-> MA in Sociology -> France as an Au Pair (2 years) -> summer job in a French language travel company ->11 years there working up to a managerial position in the French company -> moved to England to create and manage a UK office for French company(6 years) -> back to Scotland to set up my own Inbound company in 2006.
French – Higher level at school -> total immersion living in the country itself with a couple of courses in the beginning at the local Chamber of
Commerce.

Talk us through a day in your life
Hours vary as the seasons do and as I am a director I can chose my own working schedule. Most varied day would be admin – accounts – banking – bookings – marketing – meeting clients and students. For example A-Z tasks of what might be involved in organising a school trip for a foreign class visiting the UK or Ireland – admin, accommodation, ground transport, visits, lessons, insurance, meeting the suppliers, meeting the clients, documents, inspections and accounts.

Was this your planned career when you were 18?
No – I was not sure what I wanted to do. I made the decision to do a University degree which might give me the skills I did not think I had gained at school at the time (self-study, analytical and organisations skills, living away from home) which I could use in a variety career paths.

What did your parents want you to do?
My parents wanted me to become a geography or maths teacher as I was good at these subjects at school in the end they were happy that I was happy!

What advice would you give to someone interested in your career?
Do some sort of further education course after school, possibly in business/languages, then go abroad to work in the same domain to really put into practice a foreign language or learn a new one or work for a company doing the same business in the UK. Be geographically mobile and have a good work ethic.

What other career directions could you go in?
I could teach English to foreign students – become a Director of Studies in a language school. I could probably do almost any admin job or PA work or go into another managerial job. It is a career in which you have to cover so many areas which could then be applied to other domains (with a little extra training).

Company Director 2

What do you do for a living?
I am company director for Scotair Global Ltd www.scotair.com- International Hot Air Balloon & Thermal Airship Operators / Web Designers & TV Format Creators
I am also a partner in The HOPE Consultancy www.thehopeconsultancy.org.uk– a Fundraising and Marketing consultancy firm.
My particular speciality with both organisations is web design, branding, digital marketing and fundraising, use of social media and database analysis and development.

How did you get interested in what you do? What advice was available to you when you chose this career direction?
I fell in to both industries from an administrative background which I increasingly found stifling and boring. I had no plan to chose this career and it didn’t feature on my radar as a younger woman so no advice was sought. I enjoy being creative and found web design to be a great outlet, initially for my own business before word of mouth spread and taking on external clients.

What was your journey to reach the role you are in today?
I left school with GCSE’s in English, Maths, History, Biology, Geography, Drama and French. Having been bullied throughout my final two years at High School I did not wish to continue with education, particularly as we only had one college nearby where the bullies were planning to go so chose instead to enter the workforce.
Whilst still at school I got a job waitressing in a local hotel and when I left school with no plan for the future they offered me a job as a trainee hotel manager. Being completely useless at the cleaning/waitressing and cooking side of the training I found I enjoyed working on reception but not being in charge of others. I moved from the hotel industry into the aviation industry as a receptionist for a Hot Air Balloon manufacturers.
I have been in the Aviation industry for over 20 years now. After meeting my husband who ran his own Hot Air Balloon Rides company I joined him in the business, initially as an administrator.
As the business grew I became frustrated with the limitations in using outside companies to provide our branding and website and researched available packages online to take over these tasks myself. Through trial and error my abilities grew and through word of mouth the web design, digital marketing and branding branch of the business took off. I read extensively ‘how to’ manuals provided with the packages I use and continuously pushed myself to learn more. With experience came confidence and skill.
I became involved with the fundraising sector working initially as an administrator for an international charity before setting up The HOPE Consultancy with my friend and business partner. She has a number of years experience in the fundraising sector and we found a gap in the market for a consultancy able to help charities with their marketing and fundraising needs.
Both roles have progressed from administration, my ability to use a computer and my creative flair. I have found a niche that allows me a creative outlet to bring to life a clients vision.

Talk me through a day in your life… what sorts of things would it involve?
I am self employed and therefore am able to set my hours and my agenda. Sometimes I’ll work from 7am – 1am stopping for a cup of tea and a bite to eat, other days I have the freedom to not work at all. As a mum this is of paramount importance to me and is what drives all my career choices. As long as I am available when my children need me and I have the freedom to work my own hours, on my own initiative, using my creativity I’m happy.
I deal with Scotair Global Ltds logistics, training & client management both for the Hot Air Balloons and the pilots, in addition to working on web design and brand creation.
A typical day can involve contacting passengers, checking weather, booking accommodation, booking dates in the diary for events the balloon should attend as well as dealing with all invoicing. I also maintain our pilots paperwork ensuring his log books are kept up to date. Our pilot also travels oversees for 4-5 months of the year and I am responsible for ensuring all aviation paperwork is sent to the oversees operator, arranging travel and ensuring the pilot is kept informed of who he is flying, where he needs to be and when.
In addition to the administration, which generally takes place in the morning, I will then either be researching/designing and creating a website for a new client and/or maintaining an existing clients website. This generally takes place in the afternoon to early evening.
In the evening I work on The HOPE Consultancy. A typical session will involve me creating a logo for a new business, creating print ready stationary such as business cards, letterheads, compliment slips, posters, bookmarks, postcards etc, designing and maintaining a website for a client and/or creating html mailing campaigns for international charities.

Was it your planned career when you were 18?
No. I initially wanted to be a dancer having trained from the age of 5 with the Royal Ballet in London. I also toyed with the idea of being a nurse as I enjoy taking care of people. Mostly my ambition was to become a wife and mum.

What did your mum and dad want you to do?
When they realised I was not going to make the most of my dancing abilities my parents owned a driving school and liked the idea of my training to become an instructor to join them in the family firm.

What advice would you give to someone interested in your career?
Spend time with someone actually doing the job. The fundraising sector is a particularly good sector to get into and one I would highly recommend. The work is varied and challenging but so worthwhile. You can inspire and really make a difference to the world whilst doing something you enjoy and are paid for.

What other directions could you go in /work in within your field other than the job you have chosen?
I am particularly interested in creating brands so working with think tanks and marketing/advertising companies would be an option.

Councillor

What do you do for a living?
I’m a Councillor
How did you get interested in what you do? What advice was available to you when you chose this career direction?
I have been interested in politics all my life, and was active in Liberal Youth when at college in London. When I moved to Peebles I became involved in a couple of local issues, and decided the best way to get something done about them was to stand for election to the Council. There was support from the local Liberal Democrat party and also Scottish Borders Council ran a course called “Preparing for Elected Office” which allowed prospective candidates get a better understanding of how the Council operates and the role of a CouBe prepared for a lot of highs and lows if you want a career in politics .

What was your journey to reach the role you are in today?
My career following school was in the Hotel and Tourism industry (10 years), so I was not a “career” politician. There are degree courses available in politics but the main qualification is a strong desire to serve and represent the public, and a commitment to a political belief of how to improve services.

Talk us through a day in your life.
No day is the same. About 3 days per week I will attend meetings at Scottish Borders Council HQ. Some are formal Council committee meetings where decisions are required on services or policies. Other meetings are with individual officers. There is a lot of paperwork and reports to read ahead of these meetings. During the day I will also answer queries from constituents and ususally try to reserve one day per week to meet constituents or answer correspondence. Around 3 evenings per week are spent attending community meetings in the ward. These range from Community Councils to local action groups.

Was this your planned career when you were 18?
No – to be honest I have never “planned” a career, and having enjoyed 10 years in the Hotel and Tourism industry, 5 years as a stay at home Mum, and now 10 years as a Councillor, I am lucky to have had a variety of interesting and enjoyable challenges in my working life

What did your parents want you to do?
Law

What advice would you give to someone interested in your career?
Be prepared for a lot of highs and lows if you want a career in politics – it is not always easy to firstly get elected and secondly deliver on some of the policies you hold dear so you have to able to handle failure as well as you handle success. You also have to be prepared to see other people’s point of view even if you don’t agree with it. It is a very flexible type of work pattern so you need to be adaptable.

What other career directions could you go in?
I could try to be elected to Parliament, either Holyrood or Westminster.

Counsellor in Psychology

How did you become interested in what you do? What advice was available to you when you chose this career direction?
I have changed career to become a counsellor. My first degree was in Primary Education and I taught for 5 years. I embarked on study to become a counsellor when by youngest child began school. I have studied part-time for 5 years and have a masters degree now in counselling.

What was your journey to reach the role you are in today?
In counselling, I chose to tackle a counselling skills course first to test my interest. This was one morning a week at Stevenson College in Edinburgh. I loved it and felt I had made a good choice. I signed up for a Masters degree course at Edinburgh Napier (part time over 3 years) that involved both practical and academic elements.

Talk us through a day in your working life… what sorts of things would it involve?
At the moment I am job hunting! When I was working, my day would begin at the main centre where I was the only counsellor. I would see three or four clients in the course of a day. I would also conduct the odd assessment of people to guage suitability for counselling. I would keep notes and prepare for staff meetings. I also co-facilitated an Art Therapy group one morning a week.

Was this your planned career when you were 18?
No I went into primary teaching.

What did your parents want you to do?
Something which would get me a job. Doing something non-vocational such as philosophy or psychology or art was NOT mentioned and was viewed as frivolous and for people who had more money and less “need of a proper job”. I do not agree with this view now.

What advice would you give to someone interested in your career?
I would advise that they should follow a career in either nursing or psychology to begin with, then work towards gaining CPD in counselling financed by the NHS. Work within the NHS is the easiest route.

What other directions could you work in within your field other than the job you have chosen?
I could carry on with my teaching career and am seeking to follow this up at the moment. Other people may choose to embrace H.R. or social work. I aim to begin my own practice and supplement this with other teaching or voluntary counselling to expand my experience.

Is there anything you have not covered about your area of expertise?
It is probably a second career and having some “life experience” is helpful. I feel I left things too late (I’m now 46) but I wish I had followed a path which I was more suited for from school. Psychology would have been perfect for me or social work but I was given no guidence. This job does not really pay well and the training is usually expensive and there are extra costs incurred for every student in :
a) gaining 20hours per year personal therapy at potentially £30-£50 per hour
b) professional membership of BACP or UKCP ( student £50, full member £150)
c) professional insurance (liability) (£50 – £80)
You definitely need a lot of compassion, empathy, organisation and grit to do this job.